Twirling Spring by Maggy Zou

This is the first in a series of geometric shape abstracts.  Maggy used stencils and colored pencil while learning about the different kinds of balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial.  She was also required to use two of the three kinds of overlapping (opaque, transparent & translucent) in her composition.

 Maggy Zou.10yrs.Circles in colored pencil

Maggy Zou.10yrs.Circles in colored pencil

Posted with permission.

Positive & Negative by Kiara Jin

Positive space is what the artist wants you to see and negative space is the air.  In this drawing Kiara created four vases and placed them on top of a horizontal line background.  Black marker was used in alternating spaces to mix up the positive from the negative and therefore requiring the viewer to search in order to find the vases.  

 Kiara Jin.8 yrs.Vases in markers

Kiara Jin.8 yrs.Vases in markers

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Spotlight on Isabella Fonseca

This picture is the second in a series of geometric abstracts where they must stretch their imaginations. Students are instructed to use white as a color and not as a background.  In addition they learn about symmetrical vs. asymmetrical and opaque vs. transparent to increase their composition vocabulary. 

 Isabella Fonseca.11 yrs.Triangles in Markers

Isabella Fonseca.11 yrs.Triangles in Markers

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Frottage by Emma Kaufmann

Texture is one of the elements of art and frottage is an art technique in which a rubbing is taken of a surface to create a design.  in this picture Emma is used real objects and places them under her paper and used crayons to bring out the actual texture.

 Emma Kaufmann.15 yrs.crayon.Textured Landscape

Emma Kaufmann.15 yrs.crayon.Textured Landscape

 Emma Kaufmann.15 yrs.crayon.collage rubbing

Emma Kaufmann.15 yrs.crayon.collage rubbing

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Spotlight on Christine Tang

This drawing is part of a series that my students do to learn about texture and pattern.  Texture is one of the Elements of Art, all patterns have a texture but not all textures have a pattern.  There are different kinds of textures: actual or real, invented or implied, and simulated or realistic.

 Christine Tang.11 yrs.colored pencil

Christine Tang.11 yrs.colored pencil

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Watercolor Technique by Elaine Pu

Artists using watercolors can utilize many different techniques to produce different effect. These techniques can be identified within three groups: wet, dry, or additive.  When using these techniques only a few would move the painting from watercolor to a mixed media designation. Using crayon, pastels, or ink would classify the painting as mixed media, but using plastic, string, lace, sponge, splattering, blowing, or salt allows it to remain a pure watercolor.  It is one of the favorites among my students.  I especially love the innovative ways Elaine used each one.

 Elaine Pu.15 yrs.watercolor

Elaine Pu.15 yrs.watercolor

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Waterfall by Barry Wang

This pen & ink drawing took Barry many hours to complete but well worth the wait.  I think students doing their first pen drawing find it very frustrating; I am very proud of Barry for being patient with himself and the media.  Students start by selecting from a variety of color photo's and pick one based on the textures and not the color.  Then they must convert what they see into simulated textures with the correct value.  This is the final project within the element of art called texture. 

 Barry Wang.13yrs.pen & ink

Barry Wang.13yrs.pen & ink

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